Most Attractive Products to Promote Online

As an affiliate marketer, one of the biggest challenges is finding products or services to promote and advertise to others. Niche products can be the most profitable, as they generate the largest profit margin, but they can also cause you to fall flat on your face. However, the most important aspect you need to keep in mind when choosing products to promote is the actual nature of the said products. Basically, in the world of affiliate marketing, there are two major types of products: physical and digital.

Physical Products and How They Generate Profit

One thing you need to know about physical products, as an affiliate marketer, is that they only generate up to 10% commissions, and hardly ever more. This means that you will need to sell very expensive products, or many of them, in order to ensure that you can make a living this way. While the refund rates are low, (which means that you will not have to give back money too often), they also tend to be harder to sell, as many times, people prefer to buy physical products from brick and mortar stores rather than the Internet, because they can see them and evaluate them with their own eyes.

Digital Products and How They Generate Profit

Digital products, on the other hand, are more profitable. For instance, commission rates vary from 50% to 80%, a percentage that sellers of physical products cannot even dream of. Digital products present a lot of advantages.

For starters, the merchant does not have to store them physically, and the production costs are basically zero, once an original product was created. The digital copies can be delivered via digital download, so the only costs may be related to rented bandwidth from the hosting service provider and nothing else. This allows merchants to offer higher commissions to affiliates.

Also, it is much easier to sell such products online. After all, this is their natural environment, and it is normal for them to thrive here. People searching for digital products will always search for them on the Internet, and never in brick and mortar stores. Also, the usual lower cost of such products appeals to a larger audience that consumes such items at great speed.

An argument against digital products would be that the refund rates are higher. However, seeing that there are no actual costs related to refunds, this is not such a great drawback. Related to the volume of sales you can run, it is only a small cost you will have to pay as an affiliate marketer.

So, Which One Is Better?

For affiliate marketers, the answer should be obvious. While physical products tend to be more expensive, you are bound to make less money trying to promote them, because of their production costs, and the fact that not everybody shops for them on the Internet. Seeing that digital products offer much more attractive commission rates, and you do not have to worry about having competition in the real world, you should go with digital products.

Impact of Minimum Energy Efficiency Standard (MEES) Regulations

The Minimum Energy Efficiency Standard (MEES) Regulations were introduced in the UK in 2018 to improve the energy efficiency of buildings and reduce carbon emissions. The regulations apply to both residential and commercial properties that are being let out, and they set a minimum standard for the Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) rating of a property. Landlords who fail to comply with the regulations can face financial penalties, so it is important for landlords to be aware of their obligations under the regulations and the financial implications of non-compliance.

The MEES regulations require landlords to ensure that their properties meet a minimum EPC rating of E or higher, and landlords cannot grant a new tenancy or renew an existing tenancy if the property has an EPC rating of F or G (the lowest ratings). This means that landlords must make improvements to the property to raise its EPC rating to an E or higher, subject to certain exemptions and financial caps.

Landlords can choose from a range of measures to improve the energy efficiency of their properties, including insulation, double glazing, more efficient heating systems, and renewable energy technologies such as solar panels. The cost of these improvements can vary widely depending on the size of the property and the scope of the work required, but some landlords may be eligible for financial support through government schemes such as the Green Homes Grant or the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) scheme.

The financial implications of non-compliance with the MEES regulations can be significant for landlords. Landlords who let out properties that do not meet the minimum energy efficiency standards can be fined up to £5,000 for residential properties and up to £150,000 for commercial properties, depending on the length of the non-compliance period and the rateable value of the property. In addition to the financial penalties, non-compliant properties may also be difficult to rent out, as tenants are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of energy efficiency and may be reluctant to rent properties with low EPC ratings.

To avoid the financial implications of non-compliance, landlords should take steps to improve the energy efficiency of their properties. Landlords can start by obtaining an up-to-date EPC for their property, which will provide a rating and a list of recommendations for improvements. Landlords can then choose which measures to implement based on the cost, feasibility, and potential energy savings of each option.

Landlords should also be aware of the exemptions and financial caps that apply under the MEES regulations. Some properties may be exempt from the regulations if they meet certain criteria, such as listed buildings or properties that would be devalued by energy efficiency improvements. Landlords can also apply for an exemption if they can demonstrate that they have made all relevant energy efficiency improvements but the property still falls below the minimum EPC rating, or if the improvements would cost more than the financial cap set by the government.

In addition to the financial implications of non-compliance with the MEES regulations, there are also potential financial benefits for landlords who improve the energy efficiency of their properties. Energy-efficient properties are likely to be more attractive to tenants, who may be willing to pay higher rent for lower energy bills and a more comfortable living environment. In addition, energy-efficient properties are likely to be more valuable on the resale market, as buyers are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of energy efficiency when choosing a property.

Landlords can also take advantage of government schemes such as the Green Homes Grant or the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) scheme to help fund energy efficiency improvements. The Green Homes Grant provides vouchers worth up to £5,000 to homeowners and landlords to help fund energy efficiency improvements, while the ECO scheme provides funding for insulation and heating improvements for low-income households and those living in fuel poverty.

Here is some advice to help landlords with the introduction of the MEES regulations:

1. Get an up-to-date Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) for your property: An EPC provides a rating for the energy efficiency of your property and a list of recommendations for improvements. This will help you to understand what improvements need to be made to meet the minimum energy efficiency standards.

2. Identify the measures that will improve the energy efficiency of your property: There are a range of measures that can be taken to improve the energy efficiency of a property, including insulation, double glazing, and more efficient heating systems. Landlords should identify which measures are most appropriate for their property based on the cost, feasibility, and potential energy savings.

3. Consider the financial implications of making energy efficiency improvements: While there are costs associated with making energy efficiency improvements, there are also potential financial benefits, such as lower energy bills and increased property values. Landlords should consider the financial implications of making improvements and explore funding options such as government schemes or financing options.

4. Apply for exemptions if necessary: There are certain exemptions and financial caps that apply under the MEES regulations. Landlords should check whether their property is exempt from the regulations or if they can apply for an exemption if they have made all relevant energy efficiency improvements but the property still falls below the minimum EPC rating, or if the improvements would cost more than the financial cap set by the government.

5. Communicate with tenants: Landlords should communicate with their tenants about the energy efficiency improvements that are being made and how these improvements will benefit them. This will help to build trust and create a positive relationship with tenants.

6. Keep records: Landlords should keep records of any energy efficiency improvements that are made to the property, as this will help to demonstrate compliance with the MEES regulations in the event of an inspection or audit.

7. Monitor energy usage: Landlords should monitor energy usage in their properties to ensure that improvements are having the desired effect. This will also help to identify any areas where further improvements could be made.

In summary, landlords can meet the requirements of the MEES regulations by taking steps to improve the energy efficiency of their properties and being aware of the exemptions and financial implications of non-compliance. By doing so, landlords can not only comply with the regulations but also benefit from potential financial savings and increased property values.

Superior Marketing Usually Trumps Superior Product

The largest selling mouthwash brand in the world is Proctor& Gamble’s Scope. In second position is the very popular and familiar Listerine. These products enjoy massive sales and international distribution. They command dominant shelf positioning in retailers large and small. There are very few households that do not utilize one of these products to fight halitosis.

And yet, a better product, scientifically verified, and the brand that invented the term “halitosis” to describe bad breath is largely forgotten. Once a huge seller, Lavoris has declined precipitously in consumer popularity. Why?

Originally Lavoris was used as an antiseptic during the Civil War. Formulated utilizing the ingredient Zantrate, Lavoris was first marketed as a mouthwash in 1903. Zantrate is a patented ingredient, and coupled with a low alcohol content and pleasant cinnamon flavor, Lavoris quickly exploded in popularity.

Zantrate has been clinically proven to instantly neutralize the bacteria that promote bad breath. Clinical studies at Hill Top Research in Cincinnati, and the University of British Columbia claim to show that Lavoris is three times more effective than Scope at killing oral bacteria. These studies were so compelling that the three major television networks accepted and validated the results.

Richardson-Vick, the former owner of Lavoris created a classic marketing and advertising campaign that still resonates with older Americans to this day. The Company created the word “halitosis” as a powerful branding aid to identify the problem that Lavoris could solve. It succeeded so well that the word “halitosis” is now found in Webster’s Dictionary. In addition, the term “Pucker Power” became one of the most famous slogans of all time after years of use in Lavoris advertisements.

How does a brand with a century old pedigree, solid clinical support for its claims of better performance and clever branding fall off the precipice and almost disappear from the consumer’s radar? Actually it is not that unusual and the reasons are often quite similar. Lavoris lost sight of the famous old marketing adage, “You are never the greatest, only the latest”.

Graphics, packaging, branding, sales promotion, sales collateral, public relations, display, advertising strategies, sampling and product placement are only some of the components involved in constantly refreshing a product. The goal is to keep the brand fresh and in the forefront of the consumer’s mind as times, tastes and competition changes. However, it is imperative that the consumer not be put off by the new and the changed. Remember New Coke? Remember the K-Car?

The Lavoris brand found itself in a constant state of flux. The product was involved in a number of corporate ownership changes that forced frequent management and creative adjustments. Each new owner was less than keen on refreshing the brand and making essential investments that might have protected its place on shelves, while profits were used for other corporate purposes. In the face of an aggressive onslaught from brands like P&G’s Scope, Lavoris wilted.

There are many examples of great products that are outsold by more pedestrian quality competitors. The resources to market properly, aggressively and creatively all too often trump quality. If you can’t let consumers know about a products superior features and benefits, especially in a cyclonic marketplace, your item will suffer at the hands of the more dexterous marketer. This is where alternative marketing strategies, such as bootstrapping and guerrilla marketing become essential.